Stanford pediatric gastroenterologist responds to your questions on celiac disease

One hopeful approach is aglutenase therapya where an enzyme could break down the gluten and render it non-toxic. Other working ideas include: blocking the immune reaction (i.e., auto-antibodies) through an ingestible polymeric resin, adesensitizinga the bodyas immune system response to gluten via serial protein-based injections and developing a celiac vaccine. Looking ahead, it is conceivable that celiac patients will one day be able to eat gluten-containing foods, but definitive alternatives to gluten avoidance are not yet ready for general consumer use. Antonio Ruben Murcia Prieto asks: What aboutAoats for celiac disease? The topic of oats is very much an evolving discussion among celiac experts. Generally, oats are an excellent source of good nutrients, including vitamins, minerals and antioxidants, and dietary fiber, such as soluble beta-glucans. They are high in protein, and are even thought to help maintain steady insulin levels. The working idea is that the biochemical nature of oats is gluten-free, but the manufacturing process of oats contaminates it with a common cereal protein called prolamins , which are found in wheat, barley and rye containing seeds that celiac patients have to avoid. One group of investigators analyzed 134 oat grains from various manufacturers in the U.S., Canada, and Europe, and they found that only 25 samples were uncontaminated by prolamins, and the majority of samples tested exceeded the threshold for what would be considered gluten-free. Unfortunately, results from clinical studies have been mixed. Also, even if the cross-contamination problem is resolved, the scientific community seems to agree that some celiac patients may be able to tolerate oats without any health consequences, while a subgroup of celiac patients simply cannot tolerate any oats. For now, the Celiac Sprue Association says it best with this formal recommendation: aOat products, grown, processed and packaged to be free of contamination with wheat, barley or rye appear to be suitable for some people with celiac disease, but not ALL peoplea Oats is not a risk-free choice for those on a gluten-free diet.

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Franciscan Alliance acquires Medical Specialists

Dr. Alexander Stemer said he will remain president of what will now be called Franciscan Medical Specialists. The group’s employees will remain, and they will maintain all of their benefits, Stemer said. Aside from the new name, patients will not notice much change. The offices will maintain the same services. “There will be no apparent difference from the standpoint of the patient,” Stemer said. Gene Diamond, CEO of Franciscan Alliances Northern Indiana Region, said the physicians group is a good match for Franciscan. We’ve been chatting with these folks for years, he said. The reason we have persisted is because Alex (Stemer) himself and, obviously, the group he has led have established a pretty obvious excellent reputation for high quality. Given Alex’s abilities and his vision, it was pretty clear to us that this would be a good match. Stemer said Franciscan Medical Specialists will serve as a specialty arm in the northern region, recruiting and placing university-qualified physicians where they are most in need. The land beneath our feet in health care is shifting, he said. We’ll be looking for physicians looking to join larger organizations. Aside from his role as president, Stemer will work in strategic planning in the northern region. Diamond said Stemer already is beginning to work with Franciscan on its accountable care organization in the northern region. Medical Specialists was established in 1978 and has 12 locations in Lake, Porter and LaPorte counties. Its team consists of 55 physicians and surgeons, 11 nurse practitioners and two physician assistants. Franciscan Medical Specialist locations include Munster, Dyer, Hammond, Hobart, LaPorte, Merrillville, Michigan City, Schererville and Valparaiso.

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Canadian retailer taking over Saks

Related Content Mortgage closing costs up 6% this year The Canadian Hudson’s Bay Company is buying the high-end American retailer Saks in a deal worth nearly $3 billion, including debt. The Toronto-traded Hudson’s Bay Company already owns Lord & Taylor and a network of Hudson’s Bay department stores across Canada. This latest acquisition will see the group managing 320 stores in the U.S. and Canada. “This exciting portfolio of three iconic brands creates one of North America’s premier fashion retailers,” said HBC’s chairman and CEO Richard Baker in a written statement. “With the addition of Saks, HBC will offer consumers an unprecedented range of retailing categories and shopping experiences.” There had been rumors for the last few years that Saks would be bought out, and the buyout chatter intensified in May. Reports had surfaced saying Saks might be taken over for as much as $18 per share. In the end, Toronto-traded HBC agreed to pay $16 for each Saks share. “We believe this transaction delivers compelling value to our shareholders,” said Saks chairman and CEO Steve Sadove, in a written statement. “The $16 per share price represents an approximate 30 percent premium to the May 20 closing price, the day before media speculation (of a takeover) began.” The all-cash deal has been approved by the board of directors at both companies. The takeover is expected to be finalized before the end of the year, however, Saks was given a 40-day “go-shop period” when it is allowed to consider other takeover options. “There can be no assurance that this process will result in a superior proposal,” Saks said in a press release. HBC, which was founded in 1670, will be slashing its dividend after it closes the deal. Copyright 2013 by CNN NewSource .

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New Data Concludes Wait Times for Patients With Gastrointestinal Disease Are Increasing Across Canada

Colonoscopies are among the medical tests for which professional fees face a cut of 10%. Pointing to new initial data gathered in April 2012 from the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology Survey of Access to GastroEnterology (SAGE), Desmond Leddin, Lead of the SAGE, says “a comparison of data from surveys performed in 2005 and 2008 shows that wait times for patients with gastrointestinal disease have increased across Canada.” “This CAG national survey information combined with the new fee structure in Ontario gives us cause for concern about patient safety,” says CAG President Dan Sadowski. “With evidence in hand that patient wait times have been increasing over the past seven years, we can’t support any government decision – in Ontario or elsewhere in Canada – that results in reduced access to, or longer wait times for, important medical procedures including colonoscopy, which can prevent and reduce cancer rates.” About 20,000 Canadians are diagnosed with colon cancer every year. Of that number, one-third will die of the disease. Notwithstanding these statistics, the CAG and OAG agree that cancer screening is a success story in Canada, and that prevention and early detection by access to colonoscopy is key to reducing the burden of the disease. The proof rests in the release of statistics on May 9 by the Canadian Cancer Society on the decline in deaths from colorectal cancer due to increased screening. “We have made important gains to reduce national rates of colorectal cancer through colonoscopy screening programs,” says Dan Sadowski. “We are concerned that the Ontario government’s decision to cut professional fees will have two bad outcomes. The first is that longer patient wait times will grow even longer due to a drop in access to cancer screening procedures. The second is that it may open the door to similar policy decisions in other regions in Canada. In both cases, it is the patient who will bear the brunt of these decisions.” Links:

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Stanford pediatric gastroenterologist responds to your questions on celiac disease

La Peer Health Systems Gastroenterologist Named a Vitals Top Ten Doctor

I wish there was a different answer for many patients with true celiac disease (whether they have symptoms or not). For now, a strict gluten-free diet for life is the only treatment option. Below I discuss future treatment options that may become available, but still only considered within research frameworks at this time. Mylea Charvat asks: With celiac will I ever be able to eat regular pastas and breads again? Is there any research into medication to help those diagnosed with celiac disease digest and tolerate gluten? I wish there were better news for the here and now. Unfortunately, as you know, a strict gluten-free diet a for now a is the only treatment option for celiac disease. Regular pastas and breads are definitely hard to give up, especially if you really enjoy them. With that said, many laboratories around the world are evaluating different strategies to offer celiac patients more therapeutic options in the future. One hopeful approach is aglutenase therapya where an enzyme could break down the gluten and render it non-toxic. Other working ideas include: blocking the immune reaction (i.e., auto-antibodies) through an ingestible polymeric resin, adesensitizinga the bodyas immune system response to gluten via serial protein-based injections and developing a celiac vaccine. Looking ahead, it is conceivable that celiac patients will one day be able to eat gluten-containing foods, but definitive alternatives to gluten avoidance are not yet ready for general consumer use. Antonio Ruben Murcia Prieto asks: What aboutAoats for celiac disease?

linked here http://scopeblog.stanford.edu/2013/07/31/stanford-pediatric-gastroenterologist-responds-to-your-questions-on-celiac-disease/

This is a wonderful honor, and I am deeply grateful to my patients for their positive reviews, said Dr. Elihu. The satisfaction of my patients with their experience with me is important, and I plan to continue my practice with this in mind. Patients in the U.S. trust Vitals as their source for making informed health choices, and rely on Vitals to help them select the best health facility or doctor for them. Vitals provides trusted relationships between patients and doctors through thorough patient ratings and reviews, aiding in the improvement of overall health care. Each doctor who receives the Top Ten Doctors award has maintained consistent top ratings from patients, and Dr. Elihu has been recognized for his expertise in diagnosing and treating digestive orders , with special emphasis on the prevention of colorectal, stomach and esophageal cancers. Selecting a surgeon, physician or other doctor is an important decision process for patients, and can sometimes seem like an unclear path. Vitals provides powerful resources about doctors for patients, helping to simplify the selection process and enable patients to make the right health care choices. My practice is founded on the principle of providing personalized patient care, said Dr. Elihu. Every patient’s condition or situation is unique, and must be diagnosed and treated as such. Maurice Elihu, MD is a board-certified gastroenterologist that specializes in the comprehensive evaluation of digestive disorders with emphasis on prevention of colorectal, esophageal, and stomach cancers. After completion of seven years of extensive postgraduate training in New York, Dr. Elihu returned to Los Angeles to better serve the community where he grew up. He is also an active member of American College of Gastroenterology & Southern California Society of Gastroenterology as well as a Diplomate of the American Board of Internal Medicine and American Board of Gastroenterology. Dr.

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American College of Gastroenterology Applauds U.S. Preventive Services Task Force for New Hepatitis C Testing Recommendation

Seperate multiple addresses with Commas. Must enter an email address. You must enter the verification code below to send. Invalid entry: Please type the verification code again. The Wall Street Journal news department was not involved in the creation of this content. PRESS RELEASE June 25, 2013, 1:09 p.m. ET American College of Gastroenterology Applauds U.S. Preventive Services Task Force for New Hepatitis C Testing Recommendation Text BETHESDA, Md., June 25, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — The American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) praises the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) for updating the hepatitis C virus (HCV) screening recommendations for all adults born between 1945 to 1965, the “boomer” generation. HCV is the most common chronic blood-borne disease in the United States and is a leading cause of complications from chronic liver disease. The USPSTF members concluded that “the benefit of screening for HCV infection in persons in the birth cohort is likely similar to the benefit of screening in persons at higher risk for infection.” A similar screening was recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2012. Gastroenterologists treat patients with liver disease, and, along with their liver specialist colleagues in hepatology, are on the front line treating patients with chronic viral hepatitis. “The American College of Gastroenterology recognizes the clinical challenges and realities of screening and treating chronic hepatitis C in community settings and is pleased that more undiagnosed patients can start getting the medical care they need upon diagnosis,” said ACG President Ronald J. Vender, MD, FACG. There is significant clinical evidence that, based on age alone, screening among asymptomatic adults can result in better outcomes by earlier treatment. New treatments for hepatitis C are more effective than ever in curing the infection, and may halt progression to cirrhosis, liver failure, liver cancer and death.

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