Canadian Patients Wait Longest To See Family Doctors

Long wait for doctors in Canada

Brantford, Ont., resident Richard Kinsella said he had trouble finding a family doctor when he moved to the city east of Hamilton 15 months ago. Kinsella said people in Brantford commonly turn to the emergency department. “The emergency, I’ve been twice, and I was there waiting over six hours.” Family physician Dr. Nandini Sathi’s practice is now able to see more patients within 48 hours of when they call. (CBC) People in the U.S. have quicker access to their family doctors, with48 per cent of those polled saying they could get a same-day or next-day appointment, ranking second last among the 11 countries. Germany was listed as first in how quickly residents saw their doctors, at 76 per cent, followed by New Zealand at 72 per cent. Many Canadians don’t have aregular doctor Dobrow said the report raises important questions about the wide variations among provinces in areas such as access to after-hours care, emergency department wait times, affordability of care, co-ordination among care providers, and uptake of screening programs. “Do we have the rights goals for our system? Are we looking at better health, better care, better value for all Canadians?” he said. In September, the council suggested that provinces pay attention to issues such as leadership, having theright types of policies, and legislation and capacity building. For example, overall resources in primary care could be increased by expanding scopes of practice of somehealth professionals and improving their interdisciplinary training. At Toronto’s Wellpoint Clinic, the physicians changed to an “open access” system, meaning patients no longer make appointments weeks in advance. Exceptions include people who need to prebook wheelchair transit services or a physical checkup. “As physicians, we were worried that we would become inundated with patients on a daily basis,” said family physician Dr. Nandini Sathi. “In fact, what’s happened it’s opened up a little bit more time throughout the day for patients who need to be seen.” Previously, a non-urgent patient may have had to wait up to 10 days or sometimes longer if a doctor was on vacation.

this site http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/canadian-patients-wait-longest-to-see-family-doctors-1.2501468

Pregnant, brain-dead Canadian woman on life support

dylan and robyn benson

Please report any content that violates the terms. Pregnant, brain-dead Canadian woman on life support Melanie Eversley, USA TODAY 11:58 p.m. EST February 6, 2014 Doctors in Victoria, British Columbia, hope to deliver Robyn Benson’s baby in four weeks. Dylan and Robyn Benson before the 32-year-old pregnant wife was found unconconscious by her husband and later declared brain dead. (Photo: Courtesy Dylan Benson) Doctors declared Robyn Benson brain-dead after she was found unconscious in Dec. Hospital staff hopes to deliver the Bensons’ baby in four weeks by C-section Dylan Benson writes in his blog that ultrasounds show the baby is faring well SHARE 21 CONNECT 19 TWEET 8 COMMENTEMAILMORE Doctors in Canada are keeping alive a brain-dead woman until they can deliver her unborn child in four weeks. In a case similar to one that evolved recently in Texas, Robyn Benson of Victoria, British Columbia, was declared brain-dead after her husband found her collapsed on the bathroom floor on Dec. 28. As it turned out, Robyn Benson, 32, had suffered a cerebral hemorrhage and damage was irreparable, according to the CBC. The next day, she was declared brain-dead. She was 22 weeks pregnant at the time. “At the hospital they discovered that my wife had a fluke random type of blood leak into the centre of her brain and that there was so much blood and damage that it is not reversible,” Dylan Benson, also 32, wrote Dec. 29 in his blog, http://www.MisterBenson.com . Doctors report that the baby who husband Dylan Benson plans to name Iver Cohen Benson is in good condition and Dylan Benson reports in his blog that Iver has a 60% to 80% chance of surviving the C-section doctors plan to perform. On Feb. 4, Dylan Benson wrote in his blog that hospital staff performed another ultrasound and matters were “looking good” for the baby and that Robyn Benson was “still holding on strong.” The case has stirred up some of the same issues that arose in the case of Marlise Munoz, 33, who was 14 weeks pregnant when her husband, Erick Munoz, found her unconscious on the kitchen floor Nov.

such a good point http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/02/06/brain-dead-canada-pregnant-mom/5270317/

Canadian doctors say fee cuts, pay inequalities will spur exodus

NP

New technology makes them faster to carry out, but in many provinces the payment has stayed the same, resulting in something of a windfall for ophthalmologists. The reaction to the recommendations was swift. The losing specialties voiced outrage, predicting harm to patients and a mass flight out of the province. As had happened when B.C. and Alberta went through a similar process, nothing ever came of the report. Comparing Canada to other countries is tricky, given the different methods of paying doctors and varying costs of living. A 2009 report by the Organization for economic co-operation and development (OECD) tries to even it all out, relating doctor pay to each nations average worker salaries. It puts Canadian specialist doctors at 4.7 times the average wage, higher than all but Germany and Holland, with the U.K. at 2.6 times and France 3.2. The report does not include the U.S. Surprisingly, some figures suggest this country is now more generous. Ms. Matthews office cites statistics from the provincial Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences and the MGMA Physician Compensation Survey in the States that indicate Ontario family doctors make $143,000 more on average than U.S.

click on this http://news.nationalpost.com/2012/05/12/canadian-doctors-warn-fee-cuts-pay-inequalities-will-spur-exodus/

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